health tips

Benefits of a healthy breakfast

breakfast cerealMornings are typically when we are most strapped for time. But research has shown that taking time to eat a nutritious breakfast that is high in protein and whole grains, and low in fat and calories may do wonders. A healthy breakfast can

– help improve concentration during the day

– lower cholesterol levels

– improve memory

– decrease risk of diabetes and heart failure.

To read more about the benefits, and options for a healthy breakfast, visit

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/07/23/204567839/SKIPPING-BREAKFAST-IS-RISKY

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April Health Tip: Binge drinking

alcohol awareness

Photo Credit : CDC

The Centers for Disease Prevention wants to highlight the risks involved when women indulge in binge drinking. Binge drinking can be defined as consuming four or more drinks per occasion. (For men, it’s five or more drinks per occasion).

Binge drinking is dangerous for both men and women, but causes a disproportionate number of health and social problems for women. This pattern of drinking contributes to approximately 32 deaths per day in women! In a survey, women who binge drink reported that they indulge in risky behavior at least three times a month. This is not surprising, as excessive alcohol consumption leads to impaired judgment and decision making.

It is important to remember that no amount of alcohol is safe to drink while pregnant. There is no safe time to drink, and no safe kind of alcohol to drink. 

For more information, visit  http://www.cdc.gov/features/alcoholawareness/

Caring for Seizures: First Aid Tips

seizure first aid

Photo credit : The Epilepsy Foundation

Seizures (colloquially known as ‘fits’) can be caused by a variety of reasons, and can have a wide range of symptoms. Some seizures can cause the person to fall on the floor (generalized tonic-clonic seizures), whereas in others, the individual can have staring spells (absence seizures).

Seizures and epilepsy are not the same thing! A seizure is an abnormal movement or behavior caused due to unusual electrical activity in the brain, whereas epilepsy is the presence of spontaneous, unprovoked seizures. People of any age can have epilepsy – the causes and symptoms of epilepsy are varied, as are the treatment options. 1 in 26 people in the US have epilepsy, so it’s better to educate oneself about seizures and epilepsy. 

How should you react and provide care if you encounter someone experiencing a seizure?

  1. First, keep calm!
  2. Help prevent injury by removing sharp objects around the person, and by putting something soft and flat under the person’s head. Remove eyeglasses and loosen ties.

TIP: Contrary to popular belief, do not place anything in the person’s mouth, as this can cause injury to the jaw, teeth or tongue.

3.  Time the seizure! Call 911 in the following situations: if the seizure continues for more than five minutes, if the person has been injured or is in pain, or if the individual is pregnant.

TIP: Do not hold the person down or try to stop his/her movements. This can cause injury to the person. If the person is thrashing around, there is no need for you to restrain them. Remember to consider your safety as well. 

4.    Turn the person gently to one side to keep airway clear.

5.    Stay with the person and reassure him/her once the seizure is over.

For more information, visit

http://www.cdc.gov/epilepsy/basics/first_aid.htm

http://www.epilepsy.com/epilepsy/firstaid

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/epilepsy/epilepsy.htm